In Florida a driver can be labeled a habitual traffic offender if the driver receives three or more convictions for serious traffic offenses, on separate occasions.

A serious traffic offense is considered to be an offense such as:

  • Voluntary manslaughter while driving
  • Involuntary manslaughter while driving
  • Felony while driving
  • Not stopping after an accident involving personal injury or death
  • Driving with a suspended or revoked license

Because not paying a traffic ticket can result in a suspended driver’s license, many Floridians could unwittingly get a ticket, not realizing they were actually committing a serious traffic offense.

Hardship License

If a driver is labeled a habitual traffic offender, the driver’s license will be suspended or revoked. However, the habitual traffic offender is able to apply for a hardship license, as long as the driver has not received a conviction for driving under the influence (DUI).

In Florida there are two types of hardship licenses:

  1. Business purposes – this license restricts driving privileges to any driving that is necessary to maintain livelihood, which includes driving to and from work, necessary driving for work purposes, driving to and from school, driving to and from church and driving for medical purposes
  2. Work purposes – this license restricts driving privileges to driving for employment purposes only, including driving to and from work and necessary driving for work purposes

To apply for a hardship driver’s license, a driver must follow three steps:

  1. Enroll in a 12 hour advanced driver improvement (ADI) course
  2. Show proof of enrollment in ADI to the driver’s license office and complete application for the hardship license
  3. Complete the ADI course within 90 days and turn in the certificate of completion

If the state of Florida has deemed you a habitual traffic offender and you have questions about obtaining a hardship driver’s license, contact an experienced traffic ticket attorney.

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