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The Cuban Adjustment Act makes it easier for Cuban nationals to become legal, permanent U.S. residents with green cards.

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Are you a Cuban national living in the United States? If it is your dream to become a legal, permanent resident of the U.S., then you may be able to take advantage of the Cuban Adjustment Act. Contact the Miami immigration lawyers at Ferrer Shane Gonzalez to learn more about your eligibility to become a green card holder.

What Is the Cuban Adjustment Act? 

The Cuban Adjustment Act became a law in 1966. At the time, social and political tensions between the U.S. and Cuba were extremely strained. The American government wanted to assist Cuban citizens who were trying to escape a violent regime. Accordingly, they passed the Cuban Adjustment Act, which made it easier for Cuban nationals to become legal, permanent residents in the U.S.

Are You a Cuban Citizen Who Needs a Green Card? 

If you are, then the process may be easier than you imagine. The Cuban Adjustment Act, or CAA, waives several grounds that usually are used to argue against admissibility.

Among the benefits of the CAA are: 

  • A 30-month rollback provision that back dates permanent residency approval;
  • No claim for asylum is required;
  • Immediate family members, i.e. children and spouses, also are eligible;
  • Crewmen who entered the U.S. with C-1 or D-1 visas are eligible;
  • Visa overstays similarly are qualified; and
  • Even Cubans who illegally entered the U.S. may claim the benefit of the CAA.

Cubans Who Entered the U.S. “Without Inspection”

One of the most generous aspects of the Cuban Adjustment Act is that it applies to all Cuban nationals, regardless of how they came to America’s shores. In fact, the law spells out that all Cubans are eligible, whether they entered the U.S. through “inspection, admission, or parole.”

The U.S. Customs and Immigration Service has honored this part of the law since 1966. Cubans who snuck across the border may request parole status at any USCIS field office.

Of course, it is always advisable simply to enter the U.S. legally. This is especially true for Cuban nationals who generally receive preferential treatment.

If you would like to request parole status from the USCIS, contact Ferrer Shane Gonzalez to learn more.

The Cuban Adjustment Act and Work Permits 

Cubans who have been paroled into the United States are eligible to receive Employment Authorization Documents, which many people refer to as work permits. If you have not yet been paroled into the U.S., then you must apply for a work permit just as you must apply for a green card. Usually, these applications can be filed one year after your inspection, admission or parole into the U.S. Contact the immigration lawyers at Ferrer Shane Gonzalez to learn more.

The Cuban Adjustment Act makes it easier for Cuban nationals to become legal, permanent U.S. residents with green cards. However, paperwork is required, and so are appearances at immigration court.

You need a legal professional to guide you through this process. Trust the Miami immigration lawyers at Ferrer Shane Gonzalez to provide you with the advice you need.